Research Programme


Examining the drivers, impacts and long-term trajectories of Polish migration a decade after accession

Derek McGhee, Chris Moreh, Emilia Pietka-Nykaza

Project summary

This study focuses on Polish migrants' settlement practices in Scotland and patterns of return migration to Poland, a decade after accession. Taking into consideration the recent debate and proposed administrative changes related to the forthcoming referendum on the constitutional future of Scotland, this study will focus on Scotland and Polish migrants’ settlement practices in this region. Polish migrants have been selected for this study as they compose the largest non-UK born population in Scotland (56,000 in 2012). This research will shed light on a number of key policy questions: what drives post-accession Poles to stay in Scotland or return to Poland? How do ‘host’ institutions respond, adopt and reassure migrants to stay in Scotland? What are the long-term trajectories of Polish migrants in Scotland, those migrants who have returned to Poland, and non-migrating Polish families?

In the first phase of this research surveys and interviews with Polish migrants will be conducted to examine the impact of political transitions on their migration and settlement practices. By doing so, Polish migrants' political interests and attitudes to Scottish independence will be focused on, as well as their experiences of living in Scotland and their migration/settlement plans. The key factors and drivers that have an impact on Polish migrants' decisions to stay (and settle) or migrate from Scotland will be examined. These themes will be further explored in the third phase of the research.

The second phase of the study will explore how local opportunity structures in the form of schools, social housing and community organisations respond and adapt (or not) to Polish migrants in local places, with particular interest in the institutional, organisational and service provider agency responses to migrants in particular places.

The third phase of this study will explore further the themes that emerged in the first phase of this study (e.g. drivers for settling in Scotland/return to Poland, settling practices and re-emigration plans). This phase of the research will involve Polish migrants who were interviewed in the first phase as well as return migrants in Poland.

Project activities
 

Date Activity Description
10-14 July 2016 ISA Conference 2016 held in Vienna, Austria. Derek McGhee distributed his paper "From Privileged to Thwarted Stakeholders - Polish Migrants' Perceptions of the Scottish Independence Referendum 2014 and the UK General Election in 2015" during the "Citizenship: Dynamics of Choice, Duties and Participation" session of this conference.
27-28 June 2016 "BSA Citizenship Study Group and the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR) Standing Group on Citizenship: Political Citizenship and Social Movements" event held at the University of Portsmouth. Emilia Pietka-Nykaza presented the paper titled "From Privileged to Thwarted Stakeholders - Polish Migrants’ Perceptions of the Scottish Independence Referendum 2014 and the UK General Election in 2015" co-authored by Derek McGhee.
15-17 April 2015

BSA Conference 2015: Societies in Transition: Progression or Regression, Glasgow Caledonian University

“Poles and the Scottish Independence Referendum: denizens’ perspectives.” 

Paper presented by Derek McGhee
22 October 2014

Glasgow Refugee, Asylum and Migration Network (GRAMNet) Seminar “Polish migrants’ engagement in the Scottish Independence Referendum”

The seminar will focus on the level of engagement of Polish migrants living in Scotland in political processes by looking at their attitudes towards and participation in the Scottish independence referendum in September 2014. By so doing this study explores the following questions: How do Poles do explain and justify their motives and rights to participation in the referendum? What understandings of citizenship entitlements do Poles have in the context of the referendum?

4 November 2014

Metropolis Conference Milan. 

Migrants, Participation and Citizenship

 

“Polish migrants’ engagement in the Scottish Independence Referendum”

This paper will focus on the level of engagement of Polish migrants living in Scotland in political processes by looking at their attitudes towards and participation in the Scottish independence referendum in September 2014. By so doing this study explores the following questions: How do Poles do explain and justify their motives and rights to participation in the referendum? What understandings of citizenship entitlements do Poles have in the context of the referendum?
27-29 August 2014

IMISCOE Annual Conference, Madrid

““I would like to do things”: Refugee doctors’ and teachers’ strategies of re-entering their professions in the UK”

Paper presented by Emilia Pietka-Nykaza

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publications

McGhee, D. and Pietka-Nykaza, E. (2014) Independence Referendums: Who should vote and who should be offered citizenship? - Polish migrants in Scotland. Comment written online for www.eudo-citizenship.eu, July 2014.

Pietka-Nykaza, E. and McGhee, D. (2014) Polish migrants in Scotland: voting behaviours and engagement in the Scottish independence referendumCPC Briefing Paper 20, ESRC Centre for Population Change, UK.

Pietka-Nykaza, E. and McGhee, D. (2016) EU post-accession Polish migrants trajectories and their settlement practices in Scotland. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 43 (9) 1417-1433.

 

Media activities

You can browse all CPC media outputs and population-related articles from CPC members on our Scoop.it! page.